Archive for power

Honda Honors its Top U.S. Power Equipment Suppliers

As Honda Power Equipment Mfg., Inc. (HPE) prepares to celebrate its 35th anniversary of making power equipment products in the U.S. this August, the company honored 19 of its parts and material suppliers for excellence at the 2019 Honda Power Equipment Supplier Conference in Greensboro, N.C. In 2018, HPE purchased more than $227 million in parts and materials from 158 OEM suppliers, supporting sales of more than 3 million Honda power equipment products in North America.

HPE has the annual capacity to produce more two million Honda general-purpose engines and 400,000 finished products, including Honda lawn mowers, snow throwers, string trimmers, mini-tillers and generators at its plant in Swepsonville, N.C. HPE started building products in 1984, the third Honda manufacturing plant in America, with cumulative production now topping 37 million products for Honda customers in the U.S. and around the world.

Today, many Honda power equipment products are developed in Haw River, at the Honda R&D Americas, Inc. North Carolina Center, located adjacent to HPE.

“Over the past 35 years, Honda Power Equipment and our suppliers in America have worked together to create over 37 million products that have made people happy through technology,” said Shane McCoy, HPE senior vice president. “Looking to the future, we will continue to help make people’s lives better through the products made by our team of Honda associates in North Carolina.”

Honda honored suppliers for outstanding achievement in the categories of quality and on-time delivery. Six suppliers won awards in both categories.

About Honda Power Equipment

Honda markets a complete range of outdoor power equipment, including outboard marine engines, general-purpose engines, generators, lawn mowers, pumps, snow blowers, tillers and trimmers for commercial, rental and residential applications. Learn more at: https://powerequipment.honda.com.

40 Years of Honda Manufacturing in America

Honda will mark its 40th anniversary of manufacturing products in America in Sept. 2019. Honda was the first Japanese automaker to produce products in America, beginning with motorcycles in 1979, followed by the start of automobile production in Marysville, Ohio, on Nov. 1, 1982.

Over the course of four decades, Honda has steadily grown its manufacturing capabilities in the region. The company now employs more than 25,000 associates at 12 plants in America with the capacity to produce more than one million automobiles, three million engines, 400,000 power equipment products and 330,000 powersports products each year, using domestic and globally sourced parts. In 2018, nearly two-thirds of all Honda and Acura automobiles sold in the U.S. were made in America.

Honda also manufactures the HondaJet and GE Honda HF120 turbofan engines in America. Cumulatively, and has invested more than $20.2 billion in its American manufacturing capabilities, including more than $5.9 billion over the past five years. The company also works with more than 600 original equipment suppliers in America with cumulative parts purchases of nearly $400 billion over 35 years.

The post Honda Honors its Top U.S. Power Equipment Suppliers appeared first on Blog Honda.

Honda Insight is “Engineering Marvel”

When you think hybrid vehicle, do you think top speed of 112 mph? What about 0-60 mph in 10.6 seconds?

Thanks to the Honda Insight, you can.

Generally, we don’t come across too many articles about the less publicized Honda Insight, Honda’s pioneering hybrid vehicle. So we were really impressed by this one that stated it was a hybrid with “a little NSX” in it.

Here’s what you may want to know: “…the Insight was, and remains, an engineering marvel. The issue with hybrids is always the weight of the batteries, right? Honda made the Insight’s body from aluminium so its kerb weight was just 850kg. Less weight means less power is required and greater efficiency results.”

And: “Powertrain specs mean we best talk performance. With a fully-charged battery, Car&Driver in the US timed an Insight from 0-60mph in 10.6 seconds, a second faster than Autocar’s time for the second-gen Insight tested in 2009. Taking times with a 50 per cent depleted battery and no IMA assist at all, the Insight’s average 0-60mph time was 12 seconds. No fireball, but that’s still quicker than today’s crop of city cars. Top speed, no doubt thanks to its 0.25Cd, is 112mph.”

Power? On a hybrid? Mind blown.

Of course, here at Honda we’ve always known what a fantastic hybrid the Honda Insight was and has become. If you want a hybrid with some personality and power, be sure to stop by Apple Valley Honda, Northwest Honda, or Sims Honda today to take one for a test drive!

Solar City & Elon Musk Choose Honda Over Toyota to be Vehicle for Solar Power Discount

Buy a Honda (or Acura) and get $400 off solar power at your house? Sounds good to us!

In a first-of-its-kind incentive, Honda and SolarCity have teamed up to offer residents of 14 states, including Washington State, a $400 break on solar power if you purchase a Honda or Acura. It’s a unique idea and one backed up market research, according to this article. It seems like a solid marketing plan considering “(a) Honda and Acura sales in SolarCity’s 14-state area are pretty strong, and (b) Honda and Acura owners are more likely than other vehicle owners to be interested in solar power.”

Honda’s vice president for Environmental Business Development, Steven Center, references that second point fairly directly: “At Honda, we are always looking at ways to improve the lives of our customers while reducing our environmental footprint…. We believe Honda and Acura customers are going to be very interested in going solar once they find out that they can install solar at their home with little or no upfront cost, can lower their monthly utility bill, and can make a positive contribution to protecting the environment.”

As much as we think this solar power incentive is great, we think the most interesting part about this story is behind the scenes having to do with the fact that the SolarCity chairman is Elon Musk…as in Tesla Motors, Elon Musk. While Tesla and Honda may not be the biggest rivals or be direct competitors yet, Tesla does “a fairly significant alliance with one of Honda’s biggest rivals, Toyota.” In fact, Tesla bought its newest manufacturing plant from Toyota for next to nothing and Tesla is working on the battery system for the all new electric Toyota RAV4 (apparently, their goal is to build many electric vehicles together).

Considering all this, why wouldn’t Elon Musk and SolarCity create this car-buying, solar-powering incentives program with Toyota…instead of one of their biggest rivals, Honda? According to the article, no one really knows Musk’s reasons yet for choosing Honda over Toyota, but we are dying to know.

Is it because Musk wants to strategically get involved with several auto manufacturers for future endeavors? Is it because he doesn’t really like working with Toyota and wants to plant seeds with another company? (not that he’d ever admit it) Or, is it simply a business move and he expects more Hondas to sell and, therefore, create more business for SolarCity.

Why do you think Elon Musk chose Honda over Toyota?