Archive for usa today

Letter to the Editor of USA TODAY: Ensure car safety with help from the DMV

Honda North America EVP Rick Schostek has been a prominent voice during the Takata airbag inflator recall and testified before Congress several times. In his most recent efforts, Schostek penned a letter to USA TODAY, advocating new ways to get recalls fixed on used vehicles. Below is his letter to the editor:

USA TODAY’s article “Used car dealers won’t fix fatal flaws,” on the failure of used auto dealers to fix safety defects before sale, highlights an important problem – there are millions of vehicles on the road with unrepaired safety defects.  But our industry needs help in making sure owners know the vehicle has a lurking safety problem.

By law, automakers must fix those cars for free, and we willingly meet that obligation.  The problem is that owners are not required to bring their cars in for repair, and when a used car is sold, the new owner may be unaware that the safety defect exists.

As USA TODAY points out, used car dealers could be required to repair safety defects before selling them (it is illegal for our dealers to sell a new car with a defect).  But many cars change hands in private transactions.  Therefore, the best solution would be for Departments of Motor Vehicles to be required to refuse to register a vehicle with an outstanding recall until it is fixed.  This benefits not just the new owner, but also any passengers in the car and other drivers and pedestrians sharing the road.

Also, when insurance companies send premium notices and invoices to their insureds, they should identify any outstanding recalls.  The auto industry has developed a new tool that identifies the recall status of any vehicle.  It’s free and can be programmed to produce the information in a matter of seconds.

Automakers want to fix defects.  But we need help in finding and warning owners who may not be aware.

Rick Schostek
Honda North America EVP

The post Letter to the Editor of USA TODAY: Ensure car safety with help from the DMV appeared first on Blog Honda.

Letter to the Editor of USA TODAY: Ensure car safety with help from the DMV

Honda North America EVP Rick Schostek has been a prominent voice during the Takata airbag inflator recall and testified before Congress several times. In his most recent efforts, Schostek penned a letter to USA TODAY, advocating new ways to get recalls fixed on used vehicles. Below is his letter to the editor:

USA TODAY’s article “Used car dealers won’t fix fatal flaws,” on the failure of used auto dealers to fix safety defects before sale, highlights an important problem – there are millions of vehicles on the road with unrepaired safety defects.  But our industry needs help in making sure owners know the vehicle has a lurking safety problem.

By law, automakers must fix those cars for free, and we willingly meet that obligation.  The problem is that owners are not required to bring their cars in for repair, and when a used car is sold, the new owner may be unaware that the safety defect exists.

As USA TODAY points out, used car dealers could be required to repair safety defects before selling them (it is illegal for our dealers to sell a new car with a defect).  But many cars change hands in private transactions.  Therefore, the best solution would be for Departments of Motor Vehicles to be required to refuse to register a vehicle with an outstanding recall until it is fixed.  This benefits not just the new owner, but also any passengers in the car and other drivers and pedestrians sharing the road.

Also, when insurance companies send premium notices and invoices to their insureds, they should identify any outstanding recalls.  The auto industry has developed a new tool that identifies the recall status of any vehicle.  It’s free and can be programmed to produce the information in a matter of seconds.

Automakers want to fix defects.  But we need help in finding and warning owners who may not be aware.

Rick Schostek
Honda North America EVP

The post Letter to the Editor of USA TODAY: Ensure car safety with help from the DMV appeared first on Blog Honda.

2015 Honda CR-V Wins Cars.com/USA Today/“MotorWeek” Compact SUV Challenge

2015 CR-V applauded for its optimal balance of family-friendly features, interior room, excellent visibility and rewarding driving experience

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The 2015 Honda CR-V, America’s most popular SUV for the past decade (automobiles.honda.com/cr-v/), has won the top spot in the Cars.com/USA TODAY/”MotorWeek” Compact SUV Challenge (cars.com/news), with a panel of experts and customers choosing CR-V over six competing models.

“The compact SUV segment is among the most competitive in the industry, and we took nothing for granted with the 2015 CR-V,” said Jeff Conrad, senior vice president and general manager of the Honda Division. “The CR-V has been America’s top SUV choice for many years now, and it’s great to see that real-world customers and experts from Cars.com, USA TODAY and “MotorWeek” agree that the 2015 CR-V continues to live up to their high expectations.”

In winning the competition, the CR-V earned praise for its rewarding driving experience, generous interior room and family-friendly features. The 2015 CR-V features upgrades to styling, performance, fuel efficiency and family-friendly technology.

“The 2015 Honda CR-V came out on top because it provided the best blend of good interior room, excellent visibility and a surprisingly rewarding driving experience,” said Patrick Olsen, Cars.com editor-in-chief. “The CR-V was also packed with great family-friendly features like easy-to-fold seats, a low load floor, rear air vents and much more.”

The Challenge pitted seven of the most popular compact SUVs against each other in a series of expert and consumer testing, which determined that the 2015 CR-V was overall best-in-class. To qualify for the competition, vehicles had to cost less than $28,000 and achieve a combined city/highway EPA fuel economy rating of at least 26 mpg.